One does not involve themselves in the competitive scene of Dota 2 without coming across the names of those who have helped bring excellence to the forefront of the industry. Names such as Danik “Dendi” Ishutin, Clement “Puppey” Ivanov and Daryl Koh “iceiceice” Pei Xiang are among the few that worked towards paving legendary careers that would inspire thousands of others to become a part of the same world as Dota 2’s avant-garde.

Clinton “Fear” Loomis is one of these innovative figures. Today, he retires.

Word came from the Evil Geniuses website at noon Pacific. It followed weeks of speculation that arose when the Dota 2 Majors registration page listed Fear as having been released from his player obligations to the organization.  It ended their relationship of five years, but neither commented on the roster change until today.

Health concerns are what prompted Fear to step away from the life of a professional gamer, according to the statement made to the organization’s press release. An arm injury known as tennis elbow forced Fear to take an indefinite hiatus from competitive Dota 2 after the Monster Energy Invitational event held in 2014. The injury followed him long after his expected recovery of six weeks, which led to him stepping away from acting as a player and transitioning into a coaching position within Evil Geniuses. In 2015 he Tweeted about a potential opportunity to receive surgery that would put an end to his pain but, as he never posted a follow up, fans assumed he was proven ineligible for the procedure.

“Today, I’m announcing my retirement from competitive Dota. I have been living my dream of being a professional gamer for over a decade now, and in that time I’ve accomplished each of the goals I placed for myself and for EG Dota. Now, I have to pursue a new goal – getting healthy. I still have a passion for Dota and for competing, but the long term health of my arm has to come first. Thank you all for your support.”

Fear

The news brings Old Man Fear’s storied career to an end after eleven years, a career that began with PluG Pullers Inc. in 2005 when Dota was still no more than a Warcraft III mod. He later would play for compLexity Gaming and Meet Your Makers, as well as several other teams, before brushing with Evil Geniuses for the first time in 2009. Several years and half a dozen teams later, Fear returned to the organization when Online Kingdom saw an unfortunate disband.

During his career, Fear managed to prove himself as a creative and versatile player that set the bar for others in the scene, even as his teammates struggled to find their footing. Fear showed the world that he is one of the few players capable of successfully performing in any role that he is asked to fill on a competitive level, which only further proves that he is the kind of world-class player one would expect to see on Seattle’s main stage every year.

Team captain Peter “PPD” Dager praised Fear in his statement to Evil Geniuses’ website, referring to him as the best player to play alongside him as the team’s unofficial co-captain.

“Whenever people would ask about our team’s dynamic, I always described him as the co-captain. I could always count on Clinton to make a collected, yet decisive decision. He always had my back and I knew I could count on him when I was lost. Fear helped me reach my potential, and I believe he will continue to do that for players in years to come.”

PPD

Fear’s legacy in Dota 2 does not end here, however. Moving forward, Fear will be picking up his old mantle of team coach in order to train EG’s upcoming roster into a world-class team.  Evil Geniuses will announce their new lineup on Thursday but, with a resourceful and innovative mentor such as Fear guiding them, fans are confident that they will see the Evil Geniuses family return to the same glory they held in 2015 when they became world champions.

Today, Fear’s reign has ended. It is time for a new face to make their impact in Dota 2.

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About The Author

Sian R
eSports Director | Streamer

Sian is a self-proclaimed Star Wars historian, Fatal Frame enthusiast and crazy cat lady that's fascinated by the Kpop mashups on YouTube. Professional gaming is something that's fascinated him ever since he was a wee lad, especially when it came to fighting games, so now he rambles on about it in the form of articles that use way too many commas.