The Xbox Adaptive Controller was revealed back in May to highlight Microsoft’s effort to give gamers with movement disabilities the chance to play games. In the latest video, Microsoft highlights how the packaging itself was designed specifically for those with movement issues.

As you can see from the video unboxing the controller is much easier than other packages. With the focus being on simple to pull tabs instead of plastic strips.

 

  • Both the single-shipper and retail package have been designed to “unfold” to reveal what’s inside with minimal friction. The shipper reveals the retail package, and the retail package reveals the Xbox Adaptive Controller.
  • Discreet air cells integrated into the shipper packaging for protection for the product while maintaining a small footprint and clean design.
  • Every major step of the unboxing incorporates loops, a feature that we heard resounding positive feedback on from beta testers. Loops are a highly proven lever to assist in accessibility.  The leveraging of loops begins with the tear-strip on the single shipper, kicking off the out-of-box experience seamlessly.  On the retail box, a specially designed ‘break-the-seal’ label (which keeps the box lid secured to the base) employs two loops, for multi-directional removal.   A soft, grey loop initiates the opening experience, then there are integrated loops on both the paper Quick Start Guide (QSG) and cable folio.  There are five loops on the XAC packaging from beginning to end.
  • An open cavity area under the controller, enabling multiple ways to remove the controller from the box, including pulling via the loop or sliding it out directly.
  • The box has a low center of gravity, grounding the unboxing experience and creating a sense of stability for the end-user. Additionally, the hinged lid provides a low-effort, single-pivot access into the package.

 

 

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Adam S
Sr.Staff Writer

Adam is a Senior Staff Writer for GamerAssaultWeekly with over 5 years of experience in writing and is completely obsessed with video games. He holds a BA from Brooklyn College and lives in NY.